Evaluation of High-Fidelity Hearing Aids An essential building block for any high-fidelity hearing aid is an amplifier-transducer-coupling combination that does not audibly degrade the sound. that is, provides high-fidelity sound production as judged by someone with normal hearing. To demonstrate that such a combination is possible, two binaural pairs of hearing aids were assembled using ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1982
Evaluation of High-Fidelity Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mead C. Killion
    Auditory Research Laboratories Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois.
  • Tom W. Tillman
    Auditory Research Laboratories Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1982
Evaluation of High-Fidelity Hearing Aids
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 15-25. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.15
History: Received November 15, 1979 , Accepted January 5, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 15-25. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.15
History: Received November 15, 1979; Accepted January 5, 1981

An essential building block for any high-fidelity hearing aid is an amplifier-transducer-coupling combination that does not audibly degrade the sound. that is, provides high-fidelity sound production as judged by someone with normal hearing. To demonstrate that such a combination is possible, two binaural pairs of hearing aids were assembled using available hearing aid transducers and electronic components, one pair of Over-The-Ear hearing aids with 8-kHz bandwidth and one pair of In-The-Ear hearing aids with 16-kHz bandwidth. Objective insertion-gain measurements on these aids, Obtained with a KEMAR manikin in a diffuse sound field, revealed a frequency-response accuracy comparable to that available in expensive high-fidelity loundspeakers. Subjective fidelity ratings obtain from three groups of ]listeners judging prerecorder A-B-A comparisons (made from equalized eardrum-position microphones in a KEMAR manikin) produced a similar conclusion. We conclude that the important question for hearing aid research is no longer "What can a hearing aid design to do?" but "What should a hearing aid be design to do for the hearing impaired?"

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