Evaluation of Hearing-Impaired Listeners Using a Nonsense-Syllable Test II. Syllable Recognition and Consonant Confusion Patterns Syllable recognition ability and consonant confusion patterns were evaluated for 38 listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss using the closed-set Nonsense-Syllable Test (NST). Performance for these materials varies as a function of consonant voicing, the position of the consonant in the syllable, and the accompanying vowel. Scores for listeners with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1982
Evaluation of Hearing-Impaired Listeners Using a Nonsense-Syllable Test II. Syllable Recognition and Consonant Confusion Patterns
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judy R. Dubno
    UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
  • Donald D. Dirks
    UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
  • Laurn R. Langhofer
    UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1982
Evaluation of Hearing-Impaired Listeners Using a Nonsense-Syllable Test II. Syllable Recognition and Consonant Confusion Patterns
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 141-148. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.141
History: Received June 17, 1980 , Accepted December 29, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 141-148. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.141
History: Received June 17, 1980; Accepted December 29, 1980

Syllable recognition ability and consonant confusion patterns were evaluated for 38 listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss using the closed-set Nonsense-Syllable Test (NST). Performance for these materials varies as a function of consonant voicing, the position of the consonant in the syllable, and the accompanying vowel. Scores for listeners with steeply sloping audiometric configurations were consistently poorer than those for listeners with gradually sloping or flat audiograms. Consonant confusion analyses revealed place of articulation errors to be the most frequent, regardless of the listener's audiometric configuration. Analysis of consonant confusion patterns indicates the existence of a systematic relationship between consonant confusions and audiometric configuration. The NST findings are discussed in terms of the test's potential use and are compared to the results of existing confusion analyses.

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