Voice Onset Time in a Normal-Aged Population Evidence suggests that the fine motor coordinations required to maintain the articulatory-laryngeal adjustments represented by measures of voice onset time (VOT) should change as a function of normal aging. This descriptive study obtained measures of VOT in healthy elderly subjects as a basis for extending the model of temporal speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1982
Voice Onset Time in a Normal-Aged Population
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia M. Sweeting
    Teachers College, Columbia University, New York
  • Ronald J. Baken
    Teachers College, Columbia University, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1982
Voice Onset Time in a Normal-Aged Population
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 129-134. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.129
History: Received April 25, 1980 , Accepted December 18, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 129-134. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.129
History: Received April 25, 1980; Accepted December 18, 1980

Evidence suggests that the fine motor coordinations required to maintain the articulatory-laryngeal adjustments represented by measures of voice onset time (VOT) should change as a function of normal aging. This descriptive study obtained measures of VOT in healthy elderly subjects as a basis for extending the model of temporal speech control to the later years. Three groups of 10 subjects each were used. Group 1 was composed of subjects 25–39 years old. Groups 2 and 3 included subjects aged 65–74 and over 75, respectively. Subjects produced 30 tokens of three stimulus words beat, pete, bead, following a carrier phase. Wide-band spectrograms were prepared and measured, and the VOT data analyzed statistically. The following conclusions were drawn with respect to mean group age. The means of the VOTs did not differ significantly across subject groups. Standard deviations of the means did differ significantly; variability increased with age, both within subjects and between groups. The minimal separation of the phonemic boundaries for /b/ and /p/ decreased significantly as a function of aging, with the /p/ side of the distribution showing the greatest change.

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