Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Perception of Vowels by Hearing-Impaired Children The vowels/i I æ a У у /were presented through auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual modalities to hearing-impaired children having good, intermediate, and poor auditory word-recognition skills. When they received acoustic information only, children with good word-recognition skills confused neighboring vowels (i.e., those having similar formant frequencies). Children with intermediate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1982
Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Perception of Vowels by Hearing-Impaired Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Zarita Caplan Hack
    Central Institute for the Deaf St. Louis, Missouri
  • Norman P. Erber
    Central Institute for the Deaf St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1982
Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Perception of Vowels by Hearing-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 100-107. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.100
History: Received March 7, 1980 , Accepted October 23, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1982, Vol. 25, 100-107. doi:10.1044/jshr.2501.100
History: Received March 7, 1980; Accepted October 23, 1980

The vowels/i I æ a У у /were presented through auditory, visual, and combined auditory-visual modalities to hearing-impaired children having good, intermediate, and poor auditory word-recognition skills. When they received acoustic information only, children with good word-recognition skills confused neighboring vowels (i.e., those having similar formant frequencies). Children with intermediate word-recognition skills demonstrated this same difficulty and confused front and back vowels. Children with poor word-recognition skills identified vowels mainly on the basis of temporal and intensity cues. Through lipreading alone, all three groups distinguished spread from rounded vowels but could not reliably identify vowels within the categories. The first two groups exhibited only moderate difficulty in identifying vowels audiovisually. The third group, although showing a small amount of improvement over lipreading alone, still experienced difficulty in identifying vowels through combined auditory and visual modes.

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