Word Duration in Early Child Speech Word duration in early child speech was examined through a longitudinal study of a set of frequently occurring words for three snbjects. These samples were controlled for phonetic form, Durations were measured from wide- and narrow-band spectrograms. Results show that for some words, but not the majority, duration decreased over ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1981
Word Duration in Early Child Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathy A. Kubaska
    Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • Patricia A. Keating
    Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1981
Word Duration in Early Child Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1981, Vol. 24, 615-621. doi:10.1044/jshr.2404.615
History: Received July 10, 1980 , Accepted December 1, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1981, Vol. 24, 615-621. doi:10.1044/jshr.2404.615
History: Received July 10, 1980; Accepted December 1, 1980

Word duration in early child speech was examined through a longitudinal study of a set of frequently occurring words for three snbjects. These samples were controlled for phonetic form, Durations were measured from wide- and narrow-band spectrograms. Results show that for some words, but not the majority, duration decreased over time; this effect does not appear to be due to increased familiarity with individual lexical items. Generally, word duration variations within the tested time ranges can be attributed to the effect of position-in-utterance. From the time a child first combines two words into a single phrase, a nonfinal word will be produced with a shorter duration than it would have in isolated or final position in an utterance.

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