Veterans Administration Cooperative Study on Aphasia A Comparison of Individual and Group Treatment Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1981
Veterans Administration Cooperative Study on Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert T. Wertz
    William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Medical Center, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Michael J. Collins
    William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Medical Center, Madison, Wisconsin
  • David Weiss
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Perry Point, Maryland
  • John F. Kurtzke
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Thomas Friden
    Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Robert H. Brookshire
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • James Pierce
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Pat Holtzapple
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • D. J. Hubbard
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Bruce E. Porch
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Joyce A. West
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York, New York
  • Larry Davis
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Violet Matovitch
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Gerald K. Morley
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Ernesto Resurreccion
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1981
Veterans Administration Cooperative Study on Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1981, Vol. 24, 580-594. doi:10.1044/jshr.2404.580
History: Received November 21, 1979 , Accepted September 25, 1980
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1981, Vol. 24, 580-594. doi:10.1044/jshr.2404.580
History: Received November 21, 1979; Accepted September 25, 1980

Five Veterans Administration Medical Centers participated in an investigation designed to compare individual with group treatment for aphasic patients who had suffered a left hemisphere cerebral vascular accident. Patients who met selection criteria were assigned randomly to either traditional, individual, stimulus-response type treatment of specific language deficits or group therapy designed to improve communication through group interaction and discussion with no direct treatment of specific language deficits. All patients received eight hours of therapy each week beginning at four weeks postonset and continuing until 48 weeks postonset or until they dropped out of the study. A battery of language measures and a clinical neurologic evaluation were administered at intake and every 11 weeks a patient was in the study. Results show both individually and group-treated patients made significant improvement in language abilities. Individual treatment resulted in significantly better overall performance on the Porch Index of Communicative Ability; however, no significant differences were observed between groups on the other language measures. If the traditional belief is correct that significant spontaneous recovery is complete by three to six months postonset, significant improvement in both groups beyond 26 weeks postonset indicates both individual and group treatment are efficacious methods for managing aphasic patients.

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