Effects of Stimulus Material on the Dichotic Listening Performance of Aphasic Patients Sixteen aphasic patients were given five different verbal dichotic listening tests. The differences among results obtained on digit test, a high-contrast word test (perception of either vocalic or consonantal information was sufficient for accurate responses), and a vowel-word test (perception of vocalic information was required for accurate responses) were not ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1981
Effects of Stimulus Material on the Dichotic Listening Performance of Aphasic Patients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Niccum
    Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis
  • Alan B. Rubens
    Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis
  • Charles Speaks
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1981
Effects of Stimulus Material on the Dichotic Listening Performance of Aphasic Patients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1981, Vol. 24, 526-534. doi:10.1044/jshr.2404.526
History: Received December 1, 1980 , Accepted April 24, 1981
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1981, Vol. 24, 526-534. doi:10.1044/jshr.2404.526
History: Received December 1, 1980; Accepted April 24, 1981

Sixteen aphasic patients were given five different verbal dichotic listening tests. The differences among results obtained on digit test, a high-contrast word test (perception of either vocalic or consonantal information was sufficient for accurate responses), and a vowel-word test (perception of vocalic information was required for accurate responses) were not significant. However, a consonant-word test resulted in significant decreases in both left- and right-ear scores and an increase in the difference in accuracy for the two ears. A consonant-vowel nonsense-syllable test produced further dramatic reductions in performance levels, and the magnitude of difference scores between ears was limited by low levels of performanse for the majority of patients. Attempts to identify relations between patterns of performance on dichotic listening tests and radiographic evidence of lesion location were most profitable when they involved the right-ear (RE) scores on the digit test. The discontinuity in the distribution of these scores corresponded to the presence or absence of damage to the geniculo-temporal system. That is, when the geniculo-temporal system was spared, the RE scores exceeded 75% correct, whereas damage to the geniculo-temporal system was associated with RE scores of less than 50% correct.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access