Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Pathologic and Normal Speakers The purpose of this study was to determine if measures of speaking fundamental frequency and its perturbation could be useful in differentiating talkers with no known vocal pathology and talkers with cancer of the larynx. Ten male subjects, five with a diagnosed malignancy of the larynx and five with normal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1980
Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Pathologic and Normal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Murry
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, California
  • E. Thomas Doherty
    University of Florida, Gainesville
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1980
Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Pathologic and Normal Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1980, Vol. 23, 361-369. doi:10.1044/jshr.2302.361
History: Received March 26, 1979 , Accepted May 22, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1980, Vol. 23, 361-369. doi:10.1044/jshr.2302.361
History: Received March 26, 1979; Accepted May 22, 1979

The purpose of this study was to determine if measures of speaking fundamental frequency and its perturbation could be useful in differentiating talkers with no known vocal pathology and talkers with cancer of the larynx. Ten male subjects, five with a diagnosed malignancy of the larynx and five with normal voice, produced speech samples from which five voice production measures were obtained: the average speaking fundamental frequency (SFF), SFF variability during the reading of a sentence, the f0 of a sustained vowel and a percent and magnitude jitter value. The perturbation factors, both directional and magnitudinal, during sustained vowels were found to be significant in discriminating normal talkers from those with laryngeal cancer. The speaking funda- mental frequency and its variability during the reading of a sentence improved the dis- criminant function.

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