Middle Component AERs from Neonates to Low-Level Tonal Stimuli Ipsilaterat and contralateral middle-component AERs (8–90 ms) were recorded from 20 normal neonates. AERs were elicited with either 500-Hz or 3000-Hz tone-pips presented monotically at 10, 30, and 50 dB HL. AERs also were obtained for silent control conditions. In general, latencies decreased and amplitudes increased with increasing stimulus level. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1980
Middle Component AERs from Neonates to Low-Level Tonal Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth E. Wolf
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Robert Goldstein
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1980
Middle Component AERs from Neonates to Low-Level Tonal Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1980, Vol. 23, 185-201. doi:10.1044/jshr.2301.185
History: Received July 20, 1978 , Accepted March 30, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1980, Vol. 23, 185-201. doi:10.1044/jshr.2301.185
History: Received July 20, 1978; Accepted March 30, 1979

Ipsilaterat and contralateral middle-component AERs (8–90 ms) were recorded from 20 normal neonates. AERs were elicited with either 500-Hz or 3000-Hz tone-pips presented monotically at 10, 30, and 50 dB HL. AERs also were obtained for silent control conditions. In general, latencies decreased and amplitudes increased with increasing stimulus level. Responses to 500-Hz tone-pips were larger than those for 3000 Hz. The results are similar to those obtained from adults. The neonates' middle-components, however, differ from those of adults in terms of the small contribution of the electroencephalic activity beyond 60 ms, and in the asymmetry between the ipsilateral and contralateral AERs.

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