Consonant Similarity Judgments by Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners This investigation attempted to identify listener strategies or perceptual modes that might be adopted by hearing-impaired listeners when making similarity judgments among pairs of speech sounds. Further, an attempt was made to describe the relationship between similarity judgments and auditory confusions for such listeners. Subjects provided similarity ratings and recognition ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1980
Consonant Similarity Judgments by Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Allen A. Montgomery
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Robert A. Prosek
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • Daniel M. Schwartz
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1980
Consonant Similarity Judgments by Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1980, Vol. 23, 162-184. doi:10.1044/jshr.2301.162
History: Received June 2, 1978 , Accepted April 10, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1980, Vol. 23, 162-184. doi:10.1044/jshr.2301.162
History: Received June 2, 1978; Accepted April 10, 1979

This investigation attempted to identify listener strategies or perceptual modes that might be adopted by hearing-impaired listeners when making similarity judgments among pairs of speech sounds. Further, an attempt was made to describe the relationship between similarity judgments and auditory confusions for such listeners. Subjects provided similarity ratings and recognition responses to consonant pairs. The resulting similarity judgments were organized into a variety of similarity matrices and analyzed via multidimensional scaling and hierarchical clustering, as well as by traditional descriptive and interpretative statistics. The analyses of the similarity ratings between consonants showed that hearing-impaired listeners apply phonemic labels to the stimuli and base their ratings on these labels rather than on the unlabeled acoustic characteristics of the speech sounds. Analysis of the recognition data indicated that those consonants which are most confused are not necessarily the most conceptually similar to the listener.

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