Articulatory Behaviors Associated with Stuttering A Cinefluorographic Analysis Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1980
Articulatory Behaviors Associated with Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald Zimmermann
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1980
Articulatory Behaviors Associated with Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1980, Vol. 23, 108-121. doi:10.1044/jshr.2301.108
History: Received May 22, 1978 , Accepted February 15, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1980, Vol. 23, 108-121. doi:10.1044/jshr.2301.108
History: Received May 22, 1978; Accepted February 15, 1979

High speed (150 fps) einefluorographie techniques were used to record articulatory movements during fluent and dis fluent speech from four stutterers and control utter- ances from one normal speaker. Analyses of 11 perceptually disfluent utterances are reported. The results show: (1) interarticulator positions occurring in both perceptually fluent and disfluent utterances of stutterers were unlike those in fluent utterances of a normal speaker; (2) aberrant interarticulator positions preceded repetitive movements and static posturing; (3) consistent interarticulator repositioning which precedes termi- nation of an oscillatory movement or static position often results in: (a) the lowering of the jaw or lip, and/or (b) tongue shapes which resemble shapes found in normal speak- ers' fluent productions or the resting tongue shapes of the stutterer: The systematic re- positioning and other patterns found are discussed in terms of possible neuromotor mechanisms involved in disfluency. It is suggested that reflex interactions among the muscles of articulation might account for some of these effects. A brief discussion of theoretical and therapeutic implications is included.

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