Article/Report  |   April 2008
Language Outcomes of 7-Year-Old Children With or Without a History of Late Language Emergence at 24 Months
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mabel L. Rice
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Catherine L. Taylor
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia
  • Stephen R. Zubrick
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia
  • Contact author: Mabel L. Rice, 3031 Dole Human Development Center, University of Kansas, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045. E-mail: mabel@ku.edu.
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article/Report   |   April 2008
Language Outcomes of 7-Year-Old Children With or Without a History of Late Language Emergence at 24 Months
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2008, Vol. 51, 394-407. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/029)
History: Received January 26, 2007 , Accepted July 17, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2008, Vol. 51, 394-407. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/029)
History: Received January 26, 2007; Accepted July 17, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 42

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the language outcomes of 7-year-old children with and without a history of late language emergence at 24 months.

Method: One hundred twenty-eight children with a history of late language emergence (LLE) at 24 months and 109 children with a history of normal language emergence (NLE) at 24 months participated in direct behavioral assessment of multiple dimensions of language at 7 years. The children were recruited from a prospective cohort study of 1,766 epidemiologically ascertained 24-month-old singleton children.

Results: The group mean for the LLE children was within the typical range on an omnibus measure of general language ability and measures of specific dimensions of language. However, a greater percentage of LLE children, relative to NLE children, performed below normative expectations on a measure of general language ability (20% versus 11%), speech (7% versus 2%), syntax (18% versus 8%), and morphosyntax (9%–23% versus 2%–14%), but not vocabulary or semantics.

Conclusion: The results provide support for growth models of language impairment that predict that late onset of language foretells a protracted growth difference for some LLE children relative to NLE children, particularly for syntax and morphosyntax.

Acknowledgments
Approval to conduct the follow-up study was obtained from the Curtin University of Technology Human Research Ethics Committee; King Edward Memorial Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital Ethics Committee; and the Confidentiality of Health Information Committee of Western Australia. This study was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R01 DC005226 and grants from the Health Promotion Foundation of Western Australia. Further support was provided by grants from the National Institutes of Health to the University of Kansas through the Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences in Communication Disorders (Grant P30DC005803) and through the Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (Grants P30HD002528 and R01 DC01803). We thank Janet Marquis for statistical consultation; Denise Perpich for assistance with data management; and Sarah Beveridge-Pearce, Bradley Calamel, Piers Dawes, Melanie Epstein, Erika Hagemann, Antonietta Italiano, Stephanie McBeath, Megan McClurg, Kirsty Mackenzie, Lucy Masterson, Virginia Muniandy, Eva Muir, Elke Scheepers, and Michaela Stone for data collection. We especially thank the children and families who participated in this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access