Respiratory and Laryngeal Function During Spontaneous Speaking in Teachers With Voice Disorders Purpose To determine if respiratory and laryngeal function during spontaneous speaking were different for teachers with voice disorders compared with teachers without voice problems. Method Eighteen teachers, 9 with and 9 without voice disorders, were included in this study. Respiratory function was measured with magnetometry, and laryngeal function ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2008
Respiratory and Laryngeal Function During Spontaneous Speaking in Teachers With Voice Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Soren Y. Lowell
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health
  • Julie M. Barkmeier-Kraemer
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Brad H. Story
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Soren Y. Lowell, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Laryngeal and Speech Section, Bethesda, MD 20892. E-mail: lowells@ninds.nih.gov.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2008
Respiratory and Laryngeal Function During Spontaneous Speaking in Teachers With Voice Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2008, Vol. 51, 333-349. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/025)
History: Received February 12, 2007 , Accepted August 2, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2008, Vol. 51, 333-349. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/025)
History: Received February 12, 2007; Accepted August 2, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Purpose To determine if respiratory and laryngeal function during spontaneous speaking were different for teachers with voice disorders compared with teachers without voice problems.

Method Eighteen teachers, 9 with and 9 without voice disorders, were included in this study. Respiratory function was measured with magnetometry, and laryngeal function was measured with electroglottography during 3 spontaneous speaking tasks: a simulated teaching task at a typical loudness level, a simulated teaching task at an increased loudness level, and a conversational speaking task. Electroglottography measures were also obtained for 3 structured speaking tasks: a paragraph reading task, a sustained vowel, and a maximum phonation time vowel.

Results Teachers with voice disorders started and ended their breath groups at significantly smaller lung volumes than teachers without voice problems during teaching-related speaking tasks; however, there were no between-group differences in laryngeal measures. Task-related differences were found on several respiratory measures and on one laryngeal measure.

Conclusions These findings suggest that teachers with voice disorders used different speech breathing strategies than teachers without voice problems. Implications for clinical management of teachers with voice disorders are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Abbey J. Grunewald Blitz Foundation and is based on the first author’s doctoral dissertation at the University of Arizona. We thank Afshin J. Emami for his generosity and medical expertise; Allison King, Caroline Sundheimer, and Sarah Wallace for assisting in data collection; and Leslie Tolbert and Richard Curlee for their valuable input on an earlier draft of this article. We also thank the Voice Foundation’s New Investigator Research Forum for their helpful feedback in the design of this study.
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