Frame Dominance in Infants With Hearing Loss Purpose According to the frames then content (f/c) hypothesis (P. F. MacNeilage & B. L. Davis, 1990), the internal structure of syllables with consonant plus vowel structure (CV) during canonical babbling is determined primarily by production system properties related to rhythmic mandibular oscillations (motor frames). The purpose of this study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2008
Frame Dominance in Infants With Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deborah von Hapsburg
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Barbara L. Davis
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Peter F. MacNeilage
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Contact author: Deborah von Hapsburg, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 548 South Stadium Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996. E-mail: dvh@utk.edu.
  • Peter F. MacNeilage is now at the Department of Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin.
    Peter F. MacNeilage is now at the Department of Psychology at The University of Texas at Austin.×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2008
Frame Dominance in Infants With Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2008, Vol. 51, 306-320. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/023)
History: Received March 1, 2006 , Accepted August 2, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2008, Vol. 51, 306-320. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/023)
History: Received March 1, 2006; Accepted August 2, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

Purpose According to the frames then content (f/c) hypothesis (P. F. MacNeilage & B. L. Davis, 1990), the internal structure of syllables with consonant plus vowel structure (CV) during canonical babbling is determined primarily by production system properties related to rhythmic mandibular oscillations (motor frames). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether auditory sensitivity affects the internal organization of CV syllables in infants identified in the 1st year of life with hearing loss.

Method CV co-occurrence patterns were analyzed for 13 infants with varying degrees of hearing sensitivity (normal hearing [n = 4], mild-to-moderately severe hearing loss (n = 6), and severe-to-profound hearing loss [n = 3]). Consonants and vowels within CV syllables were grouped according to place of articulation. Thus, an inventory of CV syllables with labial, coronal, and dorsal consonant onsets was created.

Results 77% of predicted frames were confirmed above chance. Additionally, there was no association between pure-tone average and any CV co-occurrence. Finally, co-occurrences that were not predicted by the hypothesis were statistically confirmed in very few instances.

Conclusions Auditory sensitivity may not influence intrasyllabic organization within CV syllables once infants begin canonical babbling, as the co-occurrences observed are primarily those predicted by the f/c hypothesis.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by a dissertation grant awarded by the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at The University of Texas at Austin.
We thank Sean McMahon for assistance with statistical aspects of this article. Finally, we thank those who volunteered to participate in the study and the following institutions for their assistance: Sunshine Cottage, San Antonio, TX; Child Hearing Services Program, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; and Texas Christian University, Fort Worth.
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