The Effects of Auditory–Visual Vowel Identification Training on Speech Recognition Under Difficult Listening Conditions Purpose The effective use of visual cues to speech provides benefit for adults with normal hearing in noisy environments and for adults with hearing loss in everyday communication. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a computer-based, auditory–visual vowel identification training program on sentence recognition under ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
The Effects of Auditory–Visual Vowel Identification Training on Speech Recognition Under Difficult Listening Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carolyn Richie
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Diane Kewley-Port
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Carolyn Richie, who is now at the Department of Communication Disorders, Butler University, 4600 Sunset Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46208. E-mail: crichie@butler.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
The Effects of Auditory–Visual Vowel Identification Training on Speech Recognition Under Difficult Listening Conditions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1607-1619. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0069)
History: Received March 23, 2007 , Revised November 5, 2007 , Accepted March 29, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1607-1619. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0069)
History: Received March 23, 2007; Revised November 5, 2007; Accepted March 29, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose The effective use of visual cues to speech provides benefit for adults with normal hearing in noisy environments and for adults with hearing loss in everyday communication. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a computer-based, auditory–visual vowel identification training program on sentence recognition under difficult listening conditions.

Method Normal-hearing adults were trained and tested under auditory–visual conditions, in noise designed to simulate the effects of a hearing loss. After initial tests of vowel, word, and sentence recognition, 1 group of participants received training on identification of 10 American English vowels in CVC context. Another group of participants received no training. All participants were then retested on vowel, word, and sentence recognition.

Results Improvements were seen for trained compared with untrained participants, in auditory–visual speech recognition under difficult listening conditions, for vowels in monosyllables and key words in sentences.

Conclusions Results from this study suggest benefit may be gained from this computer-based, auditory–visual vowel identification training method.

Acknowledgments
Portions of these data were presented at the November 2003 and May 2005 meetings of the Acoustical Society of America (Richie & Kewley-Port, 2003, 2005). This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant NIDCD-02229 to Indiana University. The authors wish to thank Patrick Zurek and Lynne Bernstein for permission to use stimulus materials, and Kenneth de Jong, Larry Humes, Jennifer Lentz, and Charles Watson for their many valuable suggestions.
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