Reading Achievement Growth in Children With Language Impairments Purpose This study examined the reading achievement growth of children with language impairments (LI) across the school grades. The authors sought to determine whether children with LI demonstrate a delayed, deficit, or cumulative pattern of reading achievement growth when compared with children with typical language (TL). Method A ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
Reading Achievement Growth in Children With Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hugh W. Catts
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Mindy Sittner Bridges
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Todd D. Little
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Contact author: Hugh W. Catts, Department of Speech, Language, Hearing, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045. E-mail: catts@ku.edu.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
Reading Achievement Growth in Children With Language Impairments
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1569-1579. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0259)
History: Received November 21, 2007 , Accepted April 27, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1569-1579. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0259)
History: Received November 21, 2007; Accepted April 27, 2008

Purpose This study examined the reading achievement growth of children with language impairments (LI) across the school grades. The authors sought to determine whether children with LI demonstrate a delayed, deficit, or cumulative pattern of reading achievement growth when compared with children with typical language (TL).

Method A group of 225 children with LI and a group of 379 children with TL were identified in kindergarten and were administered multiple measures of word recognition and reading comprehension in 2nd, 4th, 8th, and 10th grades.

Results Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the constructs of word recognition and reading comprehension were invariant across grades and groups of children with LI and TL. Further analyses indicated that a multiple group latent growth curve analysis was appropriate. This analysis showed that children with LI differed significantly from children with TL in initial level (2nd grade) of word recognition and reading comprehension, but they did not differ significantly in the shape of their growth trajectories.

Conclusion These results are consistent with a deficit model of reading growth in children with LI. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for early identification.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1-P50-DC02726-04 and also by National Institutes of Health (NIH) Training Grant T32 DC000052 that supported the second author. This research was also supported in part by grants from the NIH to the University of Kansas through the Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (5 P30 HD002528) and the Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences in Communication Disorders (5 P30 DC005803). The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The authors would like to thank Xuyang Zhang, Marc Fey, Susan Ellis Weismer, Paula Buckwalter, Marlea O’Brien, Connie Ferguson, Jodi Schwartz, Amy Schminke, Marcia St. Clair, Wendy Fick, and Juanita Limas for their valuable contributions to this investigation.
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