The Speech Focus Position Effect on Jaw–Finger Coordination in a Pointing Task Purpose This article investigates jaw–finger coordination in a task involving pointing to a target while naming it with a ˈCVCV (e.g., /ˈpapa/) versus CVˈCV (e.g., /paˈpa/) word. According to the authors' working hypothesis, the pointing apex (gesture extremum) would be synchronized with the apex of the jaw-opening gesture corresponding to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
The Speech Focus Position Effect on Jaw–Finger Coordination in a Pointing Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amélie Rochet-Capellan
    GIPSA Laboratory, Department of Speech and Cognition, Grenoble, France; Centre de National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris, France; and Grenoble University, Grenoble, France
  • Rafael Laboissière
    U864 Espace et Action, INSERM, University Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Bron, France, and Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Munich, Germany
  • Arturo Galván
    Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences
  • Jean-Luc Schwartz
    GIPSA Laboratory, Department of Speech and Cognition, Grenoble, France; CNRS; and Grenoble University
  • Contact author: Amélie Rochet-Capellan, who is now a postdoctoral fellow with the Motor Control Laboratory, Department of Psychology, McGill University, 1205 Dr. Penfield Ave., Montreal, Quebec H3A 1B1, Canada. E-mail: amelie@motion.psych.mcgill.ca.
Article Information
Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
The Speech Focus Position Effect on Jaw–Finger Coordination in a Pointing Task
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1507-1521. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0173)
History: Received July 24, 2007 , Accepted April 7, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1507-1521. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0173)
History: Received July 24, 2007; Accepted April 7, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

Purpose This article investigates jaw–finger coordination in a task involving pointing to a target while naming it with a ˈCVCV (e.g., /ˈpapa/) versus CVˈCV (e.g., /paˈpa/) word. According to the authors' working hypothesis, the pointing apex (gesture extremum) would be synchronized with the apex of the jaw-opening gesture corresponding to the stressed syllable.

Method Jaw and finger motions were recorded using Optotrak (Northern Digital, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada). The effects of stress position on jaw–finger coordination were tested across different target positions (near vs. far) and different consonants in the target word (/t/ vs. /p/). Twenty native Portuguese Brazilian speakers participated in the experiment (all conditions).

Results Jaw response starts earlier, and finger–target alignment period is longer for CVˈCV words than for ˈCVCV ones. The apex of the jaw-opening gesture for the stressed syllable appears synchronized with the onset of the finger–target alignment period (corresponding to the pointing apex) for ˈCVCV words and with the offset of that period for CVˈCV words.

Conclusions For both stress conditions, the stressed syllable occurs within the finger–target alignment period because of tight finger–jaw coordination. This result is interpreted as evidence for an anchoring of the speech deictic site (part of speech that shows) in the pointing gesture.

Acknowledgments
This work is part of the “Patipapa” project funded by the French Ministry of Research (Action Concertée Incitative “Systèmes Complexes en Sciences Humaines et Sociales”). Rafael Laboissière now works as a researcher at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. We also wish to thank Christian Abry and Coriandre Vilain for insightful discussions and Marion Dohen for proofreading this article.
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