Prevalence of Stuttering in African American Preschoolers Purpose In this study, the authors sought to determine the prevalence of stuttering in African American (AA) 2- to 5-year-olds as compared with same-age European Americans (EAs). Method A total of 3,164 children participated: 2,223 AAs and 941 EAs. Data were collected using a 3-pronged approach that included ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
Prevalence of Stuttering in African American Preschoolers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adele Proctor
    University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Melissa C. Duff
    University of Iowa
  • Jie Zhang
    University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Contact author: Adele Proctor, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, 901 South 6th Street, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: aproctor@uiuc.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
Prevalence of Stuttering in African American Preschoolers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1465-1479. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0057)
History: Received March 5, 2007 , Revised August 19, 2007 , Accepted March 19, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1465-1479. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0057)
History: Received March 5, 2007; Revised August 19, 2007; Accepted March 19, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose In this study, the authors sought to determine the prevalence of stuttering in African American (AA) 2- to 5-year-olds as compared with same-age European Americans (EAs).

Method A total of 3,164 children participated: 2,223 AAs and 941 EAs. Data were collected using a 3-pronged approach that included investigators' individual interactions with each child, teacher identification, and parent identification of stuttering.

Results No statistically significant difference for stuttering was found between AA and EA children. Using the investigator and teacher method of identification, the prevalence of stuttering was 2.52% for the entire sample. For both racial groups, boys exhibited a higher prevalence of stuttering than girls. Of the 3 predictors (age, race, sex) of stuttering, only sex was a significant predictor.

Conclusions AA 2- to 5-year-olds are not overrepresented in the stuttering population for this age group. When data are combined for both racial groups, the prevalence of stuttering is 2.52%. More boys than girls stuttered in this sample of preschoolers.

Acknowledgments
The first author was the minority scholar who was responsible for this research. The study was supported by a Minority Supplement Grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). The NIDCD Grant R01-DC 00459 was awarded to the second author, who was the principal investigator. Melissa Duff was instrumental in data collection, and Jie Zhang was instrumental in data analysis. We thank all of the children, parents, and teachers who participated in the study.
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