Functional Dysphonia During Mental Imagery: Testing the Trait Theory of Voice Disorders Purpose Previous research has proposed that persons with functional dysphonia (FD) present with temperamental traits that predispose them to their voice disorder. We investigated this theory in a controlled experiment and compared them with social anxiety (SA) and healthy control (HC) groups. Method Twelve participants with FD, 19 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
Functional Dysphonia During Mental Imagery: Testing the Trait Theory of Voice Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Miriam van Mersbergen
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Christopher Patrick
    University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • Leslie Glaze
    University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • Contact author: Miriam van Mersbergen, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Clinical Science Center G225, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53719. E-mail: vanmers@surgery.wisc.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
Functional Dysphonia During Mental Imagery: Testing the Trait Theory of Voice Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1405-1423. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/06-0216)
History: Received November 26, 2006 , Revised September 28, 2007 , Accepted March 19, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1405-1423. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/06-0216)
History: Received November 26, 2006; Revised September 28, 2007; Accepted March 19, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

Purpose Previous research has proposed that persons with functional dysphonia (FD) present with temperamental traits that predispose them to their voice disorder. We investigated this theory in a controlled experiment and compared them with social anxiety (SA) and healthy control (HC) groups.

Method Twelve participants with FD, 19 participants with SA, and 23 HC participants were studied before, during, and after mental imagery of positive, neutral, and aversive scripts in a within-subject reversal paradigm with multiple experimental conditions using psychometric, self-report, and psychophysiological measures.

Results In psychometric tests, those with FD demonstrated increased fear in social situations but not increased avoidance. On measures of mood, all groups responded with predicted increases in pleasant mood for positive scripts and unpleasant mood for aversive scripts; on vocal effort ratings, those with FD reported greater effort for all scripts following imagery. Under experimentally controlled conditions, the SA and HC groups demonstrated predicted activation of EMG measures of mood, whereas the FD group demonstrated overall reduced activation of EMG measures.

Conclusion Results may suggest that those with FD respond to emotional stimuli with reduced behavioral expression, compared with SA and HC groups, consistent with the temperamental trait of behavioral constraint.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this work were supported by the National Institute of Mental Health Grant MH072850, the 2004–2005 University of Minnesota Doctorial Dissertation Award, and the 2004 Minnesota Speech-Language-Hearing Association Scholarship. We extend our thanks to Edward Bernat and Susanne Gleeson for their contributions to this article and to the MNVoice speech-language pathologists who generously referred their patients to this study.
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