Babbling, Chewing, and Sucking: Oromandibular Coordination at 9 Months Purpose The ontogeny of mandibular control is important for understanding the general neurophysiologic development for speech and alimentary behaviors. Prior investigations suggest that mandibular control is organized distinctively across speech and nonspeech tasks in 15-month-olds and adults and that, with development, these extant forms of motor control primarily undergo refinement ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
Babbling, Chewing, and Sucking: Oromandibular Coordination at 9 Months
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger W. Steeve
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Christopher A. Moore
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD
  • Jordan R. Green
    University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Kevin J. Reilly
    Northeastern University, Chicago
  • Jacki Ruark McMurtrey
    University of Central Arkansas, Conway
  • Contact author: Roger W. Steeve, Division of Communication Disorders, University of Wyoming, 1000 East University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071. E-mail: rsteeve@uwyo.edu.
Article Information
Development / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
Babbling, Chewing, and Sucking: Oromandibular Coordination at 9 Months
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1390-1404. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0046)
History: Received February 21, 2007 , Accepted March 18, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2008, Vol. 51, 1390-1404. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0046)
History: Received February 21, 2007; Accepted March 18, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 25

Purpose The ontogeny of mandibular control is important for understanding the general neurophysiologic development for speech and alimentary behaviors. Prior investigations suggest that mandibular control is organized distinctively across speech and nonspeech tasks in 15-month-olds and adults and that, with development, these extant forms of motor control primarily undergo refinement and rescaling. The present investigation was designed to evaluate whether these coordinative infrastructures for alimentary behaviors and speech are evident during the earliest period of their co-occurrence.

Method Electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from the mandibular muscle groups of 15 typically developing 9-month-old children during sucking, chewing, and speech.

Results Unlike prior investigations of 12- and 15-month-olds and adults, 9-month-olds' analyses of peak correlations among agonist and antagonist comparisons of mandibular EMG data revealed weak coupling during sucking, chewing, and babble; associated lag values for antagonist muscle groups indicated greater synchrony during alimentary behaviors and less synchrony during babble. Unlike the speech data of 15-month-olds, 9-month-olds exhibited consistent results across speech subtasks.

Conclusion These findings were consistent with previous results in which mandibular coordination across behaviors was more variable for younger age groups, whereas the essential organization of each behavior closely reflected that seen in older infants and adults.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R01 DC00822, T32 DC00033, and F31 DC00295, as well as by the National Institutes of Health Idea Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Program (INBRE), National Center for Research Resources Grant P20 RR16474, the University of Wyoming in Laramie, and the University of Washington in Seattle.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access