Stalls and Revisions: A Developmental Perspective on Sentence Production Purpose The purpose of this research was to test the empirical validity of the stall–revision distinction and to provide a characterization of the development of sentence production using this distinction. Method The stall–revision dichotomy for sentence disruptions was studied in 20 typically developing children. The children’s production of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2008
Stalls and Revisions: A Developmental Perspective on Sentence Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Matthew Rispoli
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
  • Pamela Hadley
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
  • Janet Holt
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
  • Contact author: Matthew Rispoli, who is now at the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, 901 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: mrispoli@illinois.edu.
  • Pamela Hadley is also now at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.
    Pamela Hadley is also now at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.×
Article Information
Development / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2008
Stalls and Revisions: A Developmental Perspective on Sentence Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 953-966. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/070)
History: Received February 22, 2007 , Accepted January 7, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 953-966. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/070)
History: Received February 22, 2007; Accepted January 7, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 15

Purpose The purpose of this research was to test the empirical validity of the stall–revision distinction and to provide a characterization of the development of sentence production using this distinction.

Method The stall–revision dichotomy for sentence disruptions was studied in 20 typically developing children. The children’s production of short sentences was observed from 21 to 33 months of age. Developmental changes in stall and revision rates were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling, time centered at 27 months. Differences between stall and revision rates across 2 levels of sentence length were also explored with repeated-measures analysis of variance when the children were 33 months of age.

Results A clear development trend was observed for revision rate. At 27 months of age, revisions occurred in approximately 1% of children’s sentences and increased with age. No significant individual differences were apparent in the growth parameters for revision rate. In contrast, group developmental trends in stall rate were not discernable. However, stall rate increased significantly with sentence length, whereas revision rate remained constant.

Conclusion The contrasting pattern of findings provides support for the stall–revision dichotomy. The authors argue that the developmental changes in revision rate reflect changes in the children’s ability to monitor their language production.

Acknowledgments
We acknowledge the support of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R15DC005374-01 and a faculty development grant from Northern Illinois University. We would like to thank Caitlin Burke, Julie Hollich, Erin Lin, and Kristi Walkington for their hard work in collecting and transcribing these data. We would also like to give our humble thanks to the 20 families that made this work possible.
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