The Effect of Frequency Altered Feedback on Stuttering Duration and Type Purpose The effect of frequency altered feedback (FAF) on stuttering type (i.e., prolongation, repetition, or silent block) and stuttering duration (i.e., average duration of stuttering event and total stuttering time) was examined. Method Retrospective analyses of previously collected data from 12 adult persons who stutter who participated in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2008
The Effect of Frequency Altered Feedback on Stuttering Duration and Type
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University, Greenville
  • Carmen L. Frazier
    East Carolina University, Greenville
  • Joseph Kalinowski
    East Carolina University, Greenville
  • Paul W. Vos
    East Carolina University, Greenville
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    As per the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2004) Conflicts of Professional Interest [Issues in Ethics], we acknowledge a potential conflict in that the first and third authors of the manuscript are co-inventors of a device that utilizes altered auditory feedback to alleviate stuttering (i.e., SpeechEasy). These authors disclose a financial interest of minority ownership of non-voting common stock in Janus Development Group, Inc., the company that manufactures the device.
    As per the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2004) Conflicts of Professional Interest [Issues in Ethics], we acknowledge a potential conflict in that the first and third authors of the manuscript are co-inventors of a device that utilizes altered auditory feedback to alleviate stuttering (i.e., SpeechEasy). These authors disclose a financial interest of minority ownership of non-voting common stock in Janus Development Group, Inc., the company that manufactures the device.×
  • Contact author: Andrew Stuart, College of Allied Health Sciences, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Health Sciences Building, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. E-mail: stuarta@ecu.edu.
  • Carmen L. Frazier is now at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.
    Carmen L. Frazier is now at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2008
The Effect of Frequency Altered Feedback on Stuttering Duration and Type
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 889-897. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/065)
History: Received July 9, 2007 , Revised October 26, 2007 , Accepted October 29, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 889-897. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/065)
History: Received July 9, 2007; Revised October 26, 2007; Accepted October 29, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 23

Purpose The effect of frequency altered feedback (FAF) on stuttering type (i.e., prolongation, repetition, or silent block) and stuttering duration (i.e., average duration of stuttering event and total stuttering time) was examined.

Method Retrospective analyses of previously collected data from 12 adult persons who stutter who participated in an ABA time-series design while reading orally was undertaken. It was hypothesized that stuttering duration would decrease and there would be a differential reduction in the type of stuttering during FAF, concurrent with previously confirmed reduction of stuttering episodes. A total of 2,971 stuttered syllables were analyzed.

Results The total stuttering duration (s/min) was significantly reduced by approximately 50% irrespective of stuttering type (p = .0014). Although significant differences in the average duration(s) of the 3 stuttering types (p = .0064) existed, FAF significantly reduced each type of stuttering by approximately 20% (p = .0055). There was no differential effect on the reduction of proportion of stuttering type during FAF (p = .36).

Conclusions FAF positively affects the speech of persons who stutter by reducing the proportion of stuttered events with a concomitant decrease in duration of residual stuttering and total stuttering time during oral reading.

Acknowledgments
This work was presented in part at the 2005 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, San Diego, CA, on November 18, 2005.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access