Article/Report  |   August 2008
Quantitative Contributions of the Muscles of the Tongue, Floor-of-Mouth, Jaw, and Velum to Tongue-to-Palate Pressure Generation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phyllis M. Palmer
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Debra M. Jaffe
    Hollywood, FL
  • Timothy M. McCulloch
    Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA
  • Eileen M. Finnegan
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Douglas J. Van Daele
    University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics
  • Erich S. Luschei
    University of Iowa
  • Contact author: Phyllis M. Palmer, University of New Mexico, 1 University of New Mexico, MSC01 1195, Albuquerque, NM 87131. E-mail: ppalmer@unm.edu.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech
Article/Report   |   August 2008
Quantitative Contributions of the Muscles of the Tongue, Floor-of-Mouth, Jaw, and Velum to Tongue-to-Palate Pressure Generation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 828-835. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/060)
History: Received November 1, 2006 , Accepted September 28, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 828-835. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/060)
History: Received November 1, 2006; Accepted September 28, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between tongue-to-palate pressure and the electromyography (EMG) measured from the mylohyoid, anterior belly of the digastric, geniohyoid, medial pterygoid, velum, genioglossus, and intrinsic tongue muscles.

Methods: Seven healthy adults performed tongue-to-palate pressure tasks at known percentages of their maximum pressure while intramuscular EMG was recorded from the muscles stated above. Multiple regression analysis was performed.

Results: Predictors of pressure included the posterior fibers of the genioglossus, mylohyoid, anterior belly of digastric, medial pterygoid, and intrinsic tongue.

Conclusions: Increasing tongue-to-palate pressure coincides with increased muscle activity. Activation of the floor-of-mouth, tongue, and jaw closing muscles increased tongue-to-palate pressure. These findings support the use of a tongue-press exercise to strengthen floor-of-mouth muscles, tongue, and jaw-closing muscles.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grant P60-DC00976 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and Grant DC 00040 from the National Institutes of Health Research Training Program for Otolaryngology.
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