Maturation of Visual and Auditory Temporal Processing in School-Aged Children Purpose To examine development of sensitivity to auditory and visual temporal processes in children and the association with standardized measures of auditory processing and communication. Methods Normative data on tests of visual and auditory processing were collected on 18 adults and 98 children aged 6–10 years of age. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2008
Maturation of Visual and Auditory Temporal Processing in School-Aged Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Piers Dawes
    Oxford Study of Children’s Communication Impairments, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Dorothy V. M. Bishop
    Oxford Study of Children’s Communication Impairments, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Contact author: Piers Dawes, who is now with the Wellcome Language and Reading Project, Department of Psychology, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom. E-mail: pd524@york.ac.uk.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2008
Maturation of Visual and Auditory Temporal Processing in School-Aged Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 1002-1015. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/073)
History: Received April 24, 2007 , Revised August 27, 2007 , Accepted December 9, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2008, Vol. 51, 1002-1015. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/073)
History: Received April 24, 2007; Revised August 27, 2007; Accepted December 9, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 26

Purpose To examine development of sensitivity to auditory and visual temporal processes in children and the association with standardized measures of auditory processing and communication.

Methods Normative data on tests of visual and auditory processing were collected on 18 adults and 98 children aged 6–10 years of age. Auditory processes included detection of pitch from temporal cues using iterated rippled noise and frequency modulation detection at 2 Hz, 40 Hz, and 240 Hz. Visual processes were coherent form and coherent motion detection. Test–retest data were gathered on 21 children.

Results Performance on perceptual tasks improved with age, except for fine temporal processing (iterated rippled noise) and coherent form perception, both of which were relatively stable over the age range. Within-subject variability (as assessed by track width) did not account for age-related change. There was no evidence for a common temporal processing factor, and there were no significant associations between perceptual task performance and communication level (Children’s Communication Checklist, 2nd ed.; D. V. M. Bishop, 2003) or speech-based auditory processing (SCAN-C; R. W. Keith, 2000).

Conclusions The auditory tasks had different developmental trajectories despite a common procedure, indicating that age-related change was not solely due to responsiveness to task demands. The 2-Hz frequency modulation detection task, previously used in dyslexia research, and the visual tasks had low reliability compared to other measures.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Deafness Research UK Grant 368:OXF:DB. We also would like to thank the staff and students at Barley Hill Primary School, East Oxford Primary School, Sandhills Primary School, and Appleton Primary School for their help. Thanks also to Tim Griffiths and Sukhbinder Kumar for their help with the Newcastle Auditory Battery. Thanks to John Wattam-Bell for the use of the visual form and motion tasks and to Dee Birtles and Ben Harvey for their help with the visual tasks.
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