Article/Report  |   June 2008
Short-Term Word-Learning Rate in Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss in Limited and Extended High-Frequency Bandwidths
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea L. Pittman
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Contact author: A. L. Pittman, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 870102, Tempe, AZ 85287-0102. E-mail: andrea.pittman@asu.edu.
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing
Article/Report   |   June 2008
Short-Term Word-Learning Rate in Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss in Limited and Extended High-Frequency Bandwidths
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2008, Vol.51, 785-797. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/056)
History: Accepted 17 Oct 2007 , Received 19 Oct 2006
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2008, Vol.51, 785-797. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/056)
History: Accepted 17 Oct 2007 , Received 19 Oct 2006

Purpose: This study examined children’s word learning in limited and extended high-frequency bandwidth conditions. These conditions represent typical listening environments for children with hearing loss (HL) and children with normal hearing (NH), respectively.

Method: Thirty-six children with NH and 14 children with moderate-to-severe HL served as participants. All of the children were between 8 and 10 years of age and were assigned to either the limited or the extended bandwidth conditions. Five nonsense words were paired with 5 novel pictures. Word learning was assessed in a single session, multitrial, learning paradigm lasting approximately 15 min. Learning rate was defined as the number of exposures necessary to achieve 70% correct performance.

Results: Analysis of variance revealed a significant main effect for bandwidth but not for group. A Bandwidth × Group interaction was also not observed. In this short-term learning paradigm, the children in both groups required 3 times as many exposures to learn each new word in the limited bandwidth condition compared with the extended bandwidth condition.

Conclusion: These results suggest that children with HL may benefit from extended high-frequency amplification when learning new words and for other long-term auditory processes.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access

Related Articles

People: February 2013
The ASHA Leader February 2013, Vol.18, 12-15. doi:10.1044/leader.PPL.18022013.12
Complexities of Expressive Word Learning Over Time
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools October 2007, Vol.38, 353-364. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2007/037)
Coordinator’s Corner
SIG 9 Perspectives on Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood March 2008, Vol.18, 2-3. doi:10.1044/hhdc18.1.2
From the Journals: Rare Words Easier to Learn Than Common Ones
The ASHA Leader February 2013, Vol.18, 33-34. doi:10.1044/leader.FTJ3.18022013.33
State and Territory EHDI Databases: What We Do and Don't Know About the Hearing or Audiological Data From Identified Children
American Journal of Audiology March 2014, Vol.23, 34-43. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/13-0015)