Short-Term Word-Learning Rate in Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss in Limited and Extended High-Frequency Bandwidths Purpose: This study examined children’s word learning in limited and extended high-frequency bandwidth conditions. These conditions represent typical listening environments for children with hearing loss (HL) and children with normal hearing (NH), respectively.Method: Thirty-six children with NH and 14 children with moderate-to-severe HL served as participants. All of ... Article/Report
Article/Report  |   June 2008
Short-Term Word-Learning Rate in Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss in Limited and Extended High-Frequency Bandwidths
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea L. Pittman
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Contact author: A. L. Pittman, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 870102, Tempe, AZ 85287-0102. E-mail: andrea.pittman@asu.edu.
  • © 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing
Article/Report   |   June 2008
Short-Term Word-Learning Rate in Children With Normal Hearing and Children With Hearing Loss in Limited and Extended High-Frequency Bandwidths
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2008, Vol. 51, 785-797. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/056)
History: Received October 19, 2006 , Accepted October 17, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2008, Vol. 51, 785-797. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/056)
History: Received October 19, 2006; Accepted October 17, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 23

Purpose: This study examined children’s word learning in limited and extended high-frequency bandwidth conditions. These conditions represent typical listening environments for children with hearing loss (HL) and children with normal hearing (NH), respectively.

Method: Thirty-six children with NH and 14 children with moderate-to-severe HL served as participants. All of the children were between 8 and 10 years of age and were assigned to either the limited or the extended bandwidth conditions. Five nonsense words were paired with 5 novel pictures. Word learning was assessed in a single session, multitrial, learning paradigm lasting approximately 15 min. Learning rate was defined as the number of exposures necessary to achieve 70% correct performance.

Results: Analysis of variance revealed a significant main effect for bandwidth but not for group. A Bandwidth × Group interaction was also not observed. In this short-term learning paradigm, the children in both groups required 3 times as many exposures to learn each new word in the limited bandwidth condition compared with the extended bandwidth condition.

Conclusion: These results suggest that children with HL may benefit from extended high-frequency amplification when learning new words and for other long-term auditory processes.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Grant R03 DC 06573 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. I would like to thank Christina Sergi for her help with data collection and article preparation, Peter Killeen for his help with data analyses, and Mary Pat Moeller for her comments on earlier versions of this article.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access