Report  |   June 2008
Characterizing the Growth Trajectories of Language-Impaired Children Between 7 and 11 Years of Age
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James Law
    Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa
  • Xuyang Zhang
    University of Iowa
  • Contact author: James Law, Department of Language and Communication Science, Queen Margaret University, Queen Margaret University Drive, Edinburgh EH21 6UU, United Kingdom. E-mail: jlaw@qmu.ac.uk.
  • © 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Report   |   June 2008
Characterizing the Growth Trajectories of Language-Impaired Children Between 7 and 11 Years of Age
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2008, Vol. 51, 739-749. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/052)
History: Received April 7, 2006 , Revised March 29, 2007 , Accepted October 21, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2008, Vol. 51, 739-749. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/052)
History: Received April 7, 2006; Revised March 29, 2007; Accepted October 21, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Background: A number of different systems have been suggested for classifying language impairment in children but, to date, no one system has been widely accepted.

Method: This paper outlines an alternative system looking for distinct patterns of change in receptive language skills across time, involving a secondary analysis of children identified as having specific language impairment.

Participants: The participants were 184 children age-assessed at 3 time points—7, 8, and 11 years of age.

Results: The pattern of receptive language development is highly predictable. The dominant pattern of growth is consistent with declining rates of growth over time for all children. The primary way in which the children differ is with respect to their initial severity. The testing of the 2 classification systems revealed some statistically significant differences among the subtypes with regard to the shape of the growth rates, but the effect sizes associated with these differences were very small. Thus, it is possible to conclude that beyond the dominant pattern of growth, some subtypes of language impairment at 7 years of age showed only subtle differences in receptive language change across time. The results are discussed in terms of the sample selection and the age of the children who were studied.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Gina Conti-Ramsden for allowing access to the data for the purposes of these analyses. The Conti-Ramsden Manchester Language Study was funded by Grants AT251[OD] and Dir/28 from the Nuffield Foundation in the United Kingdom.
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