Article/Report  |   June 2008
Is Parent–Child Interaction Therapy Effective in Reducing Stuttering?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sharon K. Millard
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, and The University of Reading, Reading, England
  • Alison Nicholas
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children
  • Frances M. Cook
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children
  • Contact author: Sharon K. Millard, The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, Finsbury Health Centre, Pine Street, London EC1R 0LP England. E-mail: sharon.millard@islingtonpct.nhs.uk.
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech
Article/Report   |   June 2008
Is Parent–Child Interaction Therapy Effective in Reducing Stuttering?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2008, Vol.51, 636-650. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/046)
History: Accepted 17 Sep 2007 , Received 04 Oct 2006
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research June 2008, Vol.51, 636-650. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/046)
History: Accepted 17 Sep 2007 , Received 04 Oct 2006

Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) with young children who stutter.

Method: This is a longitudinal, multiple single-subject study. The participants were 6 children aged 3;3–4;10 [years;months] who had been stuttering for longer than 12 months. Therapy consisted of 6 sessions of clinic-based therapy and 6 weeks of home consolidation. Speech samples were videorecorded during free play with parents at home and analyzed to obtain stuttering data for each child before therapy, during therapy, and up to 12 months posttherapy.

Results: Stuttering frequency data obtained during therapy and posttherapy were compared with the frequency and variability of stuttering in the baseline phase. Four of the 6 children significantly reduced stuttering with both parents by the end of the therapy phase.

Conclusions: PCIT can reduce stuttering in preschool children with 6 sessions of clinic-based therapy and 6 weeks of parent-led, home-based therapy. The study highlights the individual response to therapy. Suggestions for future research directions are made.

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