Article/Report  |   June 2008
Is Parent–Child Interaction Therapy Effective in Reducing Stuttering?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sharon K. Millard
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, and The University of Reading, Reading, England
  • Alison Nicholas
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children
  • Frances M. Cook
    The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children
  • Contact author: Sharon K. Millard, The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, Finsbury Health Centre, Pine Street, London EC1R 0LP England. E-mail: sharon.millard@islingtonpct.nhs.uk.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech
Article/Report   |   June 2008
Is Parent–Child Interaction Therapy Effective in Reducing Stuttering?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2008, Vol. 51, 636-650. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/046)
History: Received October 4, 2006 , Accepted September 17, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2008, Vol. 51, 636-650. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/046)
History: Received October 4, 2006; Accepted September 17, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 17

Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) with young children who stutter.

Method: This is a longitudinal, multiple single-subject study. The participants were 6 children aged 3;3–4;10 [years;months] who had been stuttering for longer than 12 months. Therapy consisted of 6 sessions of clinic-based therapy and 6 weeks of home consolidation. Speech samples were videorecorded during free play with parents at home and analyzed to obtain stuttering data for each child before therapy, during therapy, and up to 12 months posttherapy.

Results: Stuttering frequency data obtained during therapy and posttherapy were compared with the frequency and variability of stuttering in the baseline phase. Four of the 6 children significantly reduced stuttering with both parents by the end of the therapy phase.

Conclusions: PCIT can reduce stuttering in preschool children with 6 sessions of clinic-based therapy and 6 weeks of parent-led, home-based therapy. The study highlights the individual response to therapy. Suggestions for future research directions are made.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported financially by the Association for Research into Stammering in Childhood and by Islington Primary Care Trust, who received a proportion of the funding from the National Health Service (NHS) Executive. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS Executive. We thank Derek Pike for his statistical advice, Susan Edwards for her input into the development of the article, and the staff at the Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children for their support and participation in the study. We also thank the families who took part, for their time and commitment. We recognize the work of Lena Rustin, without whom this study would not have been possible.
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