Articulatory Effectiveness, Stimulability, and Children’s Performances on Perceptual and Memory Tasks The performances of 70 children, 35 from kindergarten and 35 from first grade, were studied on four auditory measures and one oral sensory discrimination task. Each group of 35 children included seven subjects with superior articulation, seven with deviant articulation and poor speech sound stimulability, seven with deviant articulation and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1972
Articulatory Effectiveness, Stimulability, and Children’s Performances on Perceptual and Memory Tasks
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ronald K. Sommers
    Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
  • Shannon Cox
    Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Cynthia West
    Haddonfield Public Schools, Haddonfield, New Jersey
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1972
Articulatory Effectiveness, Stimulability, and Children’s Performances on Perceptual and Memory Tasks
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 579-589. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.579
History: Received March 16, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 579-589. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.579
History: Received March 16, 1971

The performances of 70 children, 35 from kindergarten and 35 from first grade, were studied on four auditory measures and one oral sensory discrimination task. Each group of 35 children included seven subjects with superior articulation, seven with deviant articulation and poor speech sound stimulability, seven with deviant articulation and good stimulability, seven with articulation defects and poor stimulability, and seven with articulation defects and good stimulability. Performances on a speech sound stimulability task were not found to be related to performances on any of the auditory measures and only slightly to the oral sensory task. Superior articulators had significantly better scores than the deviant and defectives on the oral sensory discrimination task, but scores on the auditory tasks were not significantly different. Comparison of the performances of /s/ and /r/ defectives revealed the latter group to be inferior on some auditory tasks compared with the superior articulators. Some relationships were found between subject performances on certain auditory tasks.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access