Effects of Stimulus Rate and Number on the Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response Early components of the AER were studied in relation to rate and number of clicks presented at 50 dB SL in a total of 18 subjects. Twelve subjects were presented 1024 stimuli at 15.0/sec, 9.5/sec, and 7.5/sec; 512 stimuli at 4.7/sec; 256 stimuli at 1.9/sec; and 128 stimuli at 1.0/sec. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1972
Effects of Stimulus Rate and Number on the Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert Goldstein
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Leslie B. Rodman
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Raymond S. Karlovich
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1972
Effects of Stimulus Rate and Number on the Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 559-566. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.559
History: Received August 24, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 559-566. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.559
History: Received August 24, 1971

Early components of the AER were studied in relation to rate and number of clicks presented at 50 dB SL in a total of 18 subjects. Twelve subjects were presented 1024 stimuli at 15.0/sec, 9.5/sec, and 7.5/sec; 512 stimuli at 4.7/sec; 256 stimuli at 1.9/sec; and 128 stimuli at 1.0/sec. Two trials were run with rates randomized within each trial. Responses were also fractionated off-line into smaller groups. Three subjects were presented 10,240 stimuli at a rate of 9.5/sec, and three subjects were presented 1024 stimuli at 4.7/sec, 1.9/sec, and 1.0/sec.

Mean latency measures for 1024 clicks at 9.5/sec were: Po 13.2 msec, Na 22.7 msec, Pa 34.3 msec, and Nb 49.1 msec, with the largest mean peak-to-peak amplitude, Na–Pa, of 0.73 µv. Peak-to-peak amplitudes were smaller and responses were less “noisy” for greater numbers of stimuli with no apparent effect of rate. Amplitude reduction as a function of number appears to be complete within the first 1024 stimuli. Clinical judgments of response at suprathreshold levels can be made quickly and consistently with as few as 512 stimuli at rates of 9.5/sec and 15.0/sec.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access