Phonetic Interference and Motor Recall Sources of interference external to the laboratory were tested by instructing children to learn non-English clusters or sequences. Control subjects learned comparable English units and sequences. Of three separate experiments where varied sounds and retention intervals were used, in only one instance did experimental subjects show a decrement in memory. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1972
Phonetic Interference and Motor Recall
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harris Winitz
    University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Betty Bellerose
    University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1972
Phonetic Interference and Motor Recall
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 518-528. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.528
History: Received January 6, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 518-528. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.528
History: Received January 6, 1971

Sources of interference external to the laboratory were tested by instructing children to learn non-English clusters or sequences. Control subjects learned comparable English units and sequences. Of three separate experiments where varied sounds and retention intervals were used, in only one instance did experimental subjects show a decrement in memory. The findings, therefore, do not support the hypothesis—given the conditions of the experiments reported in the paper—that extraexperimental associations cause a decrement in memory. Further, the finding that imitation is highly stable over the intervals tested suggests that “motor memory” does not contribute to articulatory decay.

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