The Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis: Implications of Research on the Variability of Stuttering Answers consistent with the anticipatory struggle hypothesis are suggested for several questions which have received a large share of experimenters' attention in recent years. The metronome effect may be due in part to the simplification of motor planning which results from reduction of speech to small units, and in part ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1972
The Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis: Implications of Research on the Variability of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1972
The Anticipatory Struggle Hypothesis: Implications of Research on the Variability of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 487-499. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.487
History: Received November 19, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1972, Vol. 15, 487-499. doi:10.1044/jshr.1503.487
History: Received November 19, 1970

Answers consistent with the anticipatory struggle hypothesis are suggested for several questions which have received a large share of experimenters' attention in recent years. The metronome effect may be due in part to the simplification of motor planning which results from reduction of speech to small units, and in part to distraction. The adaptation effect appears to be due largely to repeated rehearsal of the motor plan. An important factor in the white noise and DAF effects seems to be simply the rule that almost any novel form of auditory feedback may serve to reduce stuttering. Finally, the inconsistent effects of punishment on stuttering appear reasonable on the basis of the anticipatory struggle hypothesis when this concept is precisely formulated in behavioral terms.

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