Neuroplasticity Supplement  |   February 2008
Translational Research in Aphasia: From Neuroscience to Neurorehabilitation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anastasia M. Raymer
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
  • Pelagie Beeson
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Audrey Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Diane Kendall
    VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Gainesville, FL, and University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Lynn M. Maher
    DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX, and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
  • Nadine Martin
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Laura Murray
    University of Indiana—Bloomington
  • Miranda Rose
    La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
  • Cynthia K. Thompson
    Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
  • Lyn Turkstra
    University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Lori Altmann
    University of Florida
  • Mary Boyle
    Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ
  • Tim Conway
    University of Florida
  • William Hula
    University of Pittsburgh
  • Kevin Kearns
    Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Brenda Rapp
    Johns Hopkins University
  • Nina Simmons-Mackie
    Southeastern Louisiana University
  • Leslie J. Gonzalez Rothi
    VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Gainesville, FL, and University of Florida
  • Contact author: Anastasia M. Raymer, 110 Child Study Center, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0136. E-mail: sraymer@odu.edu.
  • © 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Supplement
Neuroplasticity Supplement   |   February 2008
Translational Research in Aphasia: From Neuroscience to Neurorehabilitation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, S259-S275. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/020)
History: Received February 9, 2006 , Accepted September 22, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, S259-S275. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/020)
History: Received February 9, 2006; Accepted September 22, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 37

Purpose: In this article, the authors encapsulate discussions of the Language Work Group that took place as part of the Workshop in Plasticity/NeuroRehabilitation Research at the University of Florida in April 2005.

Method: In this narrative review, they define neuroplasticity and review studies that demonstrate neural changes associated with aphasia recovery and treatment. The authors then summarize basic science evidence from animals, human cognition, and computational neuroscience that is relevant to aphasia treatment research. They then turn to the aphasia treatment literature in which evidence exists to support several of the neuroscience principles.

Conclusion: Despite the extant aphasia treatment literature, many questions remain regarding how neuroscience principles can be manipulated to maximize aphasia recovery and treatment. They propose a framework, incorporating some of these principles, that may serve as a potential roadmap for future investigations of aphasia treatment and recovery. In addition to translational investigations from basic to clinical science, the authors propose several areas in which translation can occur from clinical to basic science to contribute to the fundamental knowledge base of neurorehabilitation. This article is intended to reinvigorate interest in delineating the factors influencing successful recovery from aphasia through basic, translational, and clinical research.

Acknowledgments
This article is an outgrowth of the Workshop in Plasticity/NeuroRehabilitation Research sponsored and supported by the VA Brain Rehabilitation Research Center of Excellence, Gainesville, FL, and the University of Florida Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. This work was done under the auspices of the Language Work Group, led by Anastasia M. Raymer.
Special thanks to Leslie Gonzalez Rothi, Jay Rosenbek, Chris Sapienza, and Nan Musson, organizers of the event. Thanks also to several individuals who contributed to the Language Work Group discussions including Malcolm McNeil, Theresa Jones, Randall Robey, Alex Johnson, Jacquelyn Hinckley, Michael De Riesthal, Charles Ellis, and Susan Leon.
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