Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity Into Research on Speech Motor Control Recovery and Rehabilitation Purpose To review the principles of neural plasticity and make recommendations for research on the neural bases for rehabilitation of neurogenic speech disorders. Method A working group in speech motor control and disorders developed this report, which examines the potential relevance of basic research on the brain mechanisms ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   February 01, 2008
Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity Into Research on Speech Motor Control Recovery and Rehabilitation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christy L. Ludlow
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD
  • Jeannette Hoit
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Raymond Kent
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Lorraine O. Ramig
    University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Rahul Shrivastav
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Edythe Strand
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MI
  • Kathryn Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Christine M. Sapienza
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Contact author: Christy L. Ludlow, 10 Center Drive MSC 1416, Bldg. 10, Rm. 5D-38, Bethesda, MD 20892-1416. E-mail: ludlowc@ninds.nih.gov.
Article Information
Special Populations / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement: Neuroplasticity
Supplement Article   |   February 01, 2008
Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity Into Research on Speech Motor Control Recovery and Rehabilitation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, S240-S258. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/019)
History: Received October 26, 2006 , Revised June 6, 2007 , Accepted August 2, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, S240-S258. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/019)
History: Received October 26, 2006; Revised June 6, 2007; Accepted August 2, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 37

Purpose To review the principles of neural plasticity and make recommendations for research on the neural bases for rehabilitation of neurogenic speech disorders.

Method A working group in speech motor control and disorders developed this report, which examines the potential relevance of basic research on the brain mechanisms involved in neural plasticity and discusses possible similarities and differences for application to speech motor control disorders. The possible involvement of neural plasticity in changes in speech production in normalcy, development, aging, and neurological diseases and disorders was considered. This report focuses on the appropriate use of functional and structural neuroimaging and the design of feasibility studies aimed at understanding how brain mechanisms are altered by environmental manipulations such as training and stimulation and how these changes might enhance the future development of rehabilitative methods for persons with speech motor control disorders.

Conclusions Increased collaboration with neuroscientists working in clinical research centers addressing human communication disorders might foster research in this area. It is hoped that this article will encourage future research on speech motor control disorders to address the principles of neural plasticity and their application for rehabilitation.

Acknowledgments
This article resulted from the Workshop on Plasticity/NeuroRehabilitation Research held at the University of Florida in Gainesville (April 10–13, 2005) and was sponsored by the Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, a Veterans Administration Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence. Preparation of this report was supported, in part, by the Intramural Program of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. This work was done under the auspices of the Motor Speech Disorders Work Group, led by Christy L. Ludlow.
Particular thanks go to Leslie Gonzalez-Rothi, the workshop organizer, along with Jay Rosenbek, Nan Musson, and Christine Sapienza, a co-author on this report. The authors appreciate comments received from Jeffrey Kleim on the content of the article. Anne Smith and Elaine Stathopoulos participated in the discussions that led to this article as well as the following doctoral students from the University of Florida: Chris Carmichael, Neila Donovan, Amber Hollingsworth, and Harrison Jones.
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