Article/Report  |   February 2008
Parental Perspectives During the Transition to Adulthood of Adolescents With a History of Specific Language Impairment (SLI)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gina Conti-Ramsden
    The University of Manchester
  • Nicola Botting
    The University of Manchester
  • Kevin Durkin
    University of Strathclyde
  • Contact author: Gina Conti-Ramsden, Human Communication and Deafness, School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Manchester, Ellen Wilkinson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom. E-mail: gina.conti-ramsden@manchester.ac.uk.
  • Nicola Botting is now with the Department of Language and Communication Science, City University London.
    Nicola Botting is now with the Department of Language and Communication Science, City University London.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language
Article/Report   |   February 2008
Parental Perspectives During the Transition to Adulthood of Adolescents With a History of Specific Language Impairment (SLI)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, 84-96. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/006)
History: Received October 6, 2006 , Revised February 12, 2007 , Accepted June 25, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, 84-96. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/006)
History: Received October 6, 2006; Revised February 12, 2007; Accepted June 25, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Purpose: This is the 2nd article of a companion set (the 1st article being on language and independence). It presents research examining parental perspectives on aspects of impairment in their offspring involving families rearing children with specific language impairment (SLI).

Method: The same sample as that of the 1st study participated in this investigation: a total of 238 parents and their offspring (120 offspring with a history of SLI and 118 typically developing [TD] offspring). Parents were interviewed using the Transition Daily Rewards and Worries questionnaire (L. M. Glidden & B. M. Jobe, 2007; J. Menard, S. Schoolcraft, L. M. Glidden, & C. Lazarus, 2002). Measures of the adolescents’ receptive and expressive language, reading, nonverbal IQ, and socioemotional functioning were obtained.

Results: Parents of adolescents with a history of SLI had more negative expectations in the areas of future/adult life, socialization, and community resources. An exception was family relations, which was a source of reward for both sets of parents.

Conclusions: Parents of adolescents with SLI have a range of perspectives regarding their offspring; some raise concerns, some are more positive. In addition, there is striking heterogeneity in the experiences of parents in the SLI group. Variables that influence being a concerned parent involve the adolescent’s level of independence, quality of peer relations, his or her prosocial behavior, and the presence of conduct problems.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Nuffield Foundation (Grants AT 251 [OD], DIR/28, and EDU 8366) and the Wellcome Trust (Grant 060774). Thanks go to Laraine Glidden for providing a copy of the instrument and offering helpful discussion. Thanks also to Zoë Simkin for help with data analysis. We thank the research assistants involved in data collection as well as the schools and families that helped us with the research.
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