Initial Validity and Reliability of the SCCAN: Using Tailored Testing to Assess Adult Cognition and Communication Purpose The Scales of Cognitive and Communicative Ability for Neurorehabilitation (SCCAN; L. Milman & A. Holland, 2007) was developed in the hospital setting to address changes in assessment practice. The SCCAN was designed to provide an overview of impairment and activity limitations across 8 cognitive scales (Speech Comprehension, Oral Expression, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2008
Initial Validity and Reliability of the SCCAN: Using Tailored Testing to Assess Adult Cognition and Communication
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa H. Milman
    Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Audrey Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Alfred W. Kaszniak
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jerry D’Agostino
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Merrill Garrett
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Steve Rapcsak
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Lisa H. Milman, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Ohio State University, 110 Pressey Hall, Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: milman.3@osu.edu.
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2008
Initial Validity and Reliability of the SCCAN: Using Tailored Testing to Assess Adult Cognition and Communication
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, 49-69. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/004)
History: Received March 17, 2005 , Revised January 3, 2006 , Accepted June 7, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, 49-69. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/004)
History: Received March 17, 2005; Revised January 3, 2006; Accepted June 7, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose The Scales of Cognitive and Communicative Ability for Neurorehabilitation (SCCAN; L. Milman & A. Holland, 2007) was developed in the hospital setting to address changes in assessment practice. The SCCAN was designed to provide an overview of impairment and activity limitations across 8 cognitive scales (Speech Comprehension, Oral Expression, Reading, Writing, Orientation, Attention, Memory, and Problem Solving). The scales were developed using item response theory so that tailored testing could be implemented to reduce test administration time. This research investigated the validity and reliability of the SCCAN.

Method A battery of neuropsychological tests was administered to 40 neurologically healthy control participants and 51 participants diagnosed with left-hemisphere pathology, right-hemisphere pathology, or probable Alzheimer’s disease. Analyses were performed to assess test sensitivity and specificity, construct validity, administration time, and reliability.

Results The test accurately classified 95% of the control participants and 98% of the participants diagnosed with neurological disorders. Results indicate that the test also differentiated the performance profiles of the 3 clinical populations. In addition, test scores correlated significantly with external measures of the same cognitive areas. Mean administration time was 34 min. Test–retest stability (r = .96, p < .001) and internal consistency (r = .99, p < .001) coefficients were both significant, indicating that tailored testing procedures generated reliable test scores.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this research constituted the doctoral dissertation of the first author and were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s annual convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in November 2004. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Elena Plante, Sarah Burns, Pelagie Beeson, and Pat Jones as well as staff and participants at the University of Arizona Aphasia Research Project, Carondelet St. Mary’s and St. Joseph’s Hospitals, the Southern Arizona VA Hospital, Day Break Adult Day Health Care Center, and Devon Gables Health Care Center. The authors are also grateful to Albyn Davis for helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article.
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