Relationship Between Acceptable Noise Level and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit Purpose This study investigated the relationship between acceptable noise levels (ANLs) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB; R. M. Cox & G. C. Alexander, 1995). This study further examined the APHAB’s ability to predict hearing aid use. Method ANL and APHAB data were collected for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2008
Relationship Between Acceptable Noise Level and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melinda C. Freyaldenhoven
    Louisiana Tech University, Ruston
  • Anna K. Nabelek
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Joanna W. Tampas
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville and James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, TN
  • Contact author: Melinda C. Freyaldenhoven, Department Speech, Louisiana Tech University, P.O. Box 3165, Ruston, LA 71272. E-mail: melinda@latech.edu.
  • Joanna W. Tampas is now with the James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, TN.
    Joanna W. Tampas is now with the James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, Mountain Home, TN.×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2008
Relationship Between Acceptable Noise Level and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, 136-146. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/010)
History: Received December 18, 2006 , Accepted May 9, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2008, Vol. 51, 136-146. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/010)
History: Received December 18, 2006; Accepted May 9, 2007

Purpose This study investigated the relationship between acceptable noise levels (ANLs) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB; R. M. Cox & G. C. Alexander, 1995). This study further examined the APHAB’s ability to predict hearing aid use.

Method ANL and APHAB data were collected for 191 listeners with impaired hearing, separated into 3 groups based on hearing aid use: full-time, part-time, or nonuse.

Results Results demonstrated ANLs were not correlated with APHAB scores. Results further demonstrated 2 of the 4 APHAB subscales (Ease of Communication [EC] and Background Noise [BN]) predicted hearing aid success with 60% accuracy, which is 25% poorer than that observed using the ANL alone. When combining the ANL with the EC and BN subscales, accuracy of the prediction increased to 91%. Lastly, 3 of the 4 APHAB subscales (EC, BN, and Reverberation) enhanced the present prediction of hearing aid use for patients with mid-range ANLs.

Conclusions These results indicate that ANLs and APHAB scores provide unique information regarding hearing aid use. These results further indicate that the prediction can be enhanced by administering both the ANL and the EC and BN APHAB subscales. Lastly, some of the ambiguity of the prediction of hearing aid use for listeners with mid-range ANLs may be eliminated.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grant R01 DC 05018 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We thank the University of Tennessee Hearing and Speech Clinic for their assistance in acquiring listeners.
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