Speech Clinicians' Attribution of Personality Traits as a Function of Stuttering Severity Thirty-six speech-language pathologists participated in a study to evaluate clinicians' preconceptions of persons who stutter. Each rated a designated construct (the normally fluent individual, the mild stutterer, the moderate stutterer, the severe stutterer) using a personality trait scale. Results indicated that clinicians stereotypically assign negative personality traits to all levels ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1979
Speech Clinicians' Attribution of Personality Traits as a Function of Stuttering Severity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen R. Turnbaugh
    University of Vermont, Burlington
  • Barry E. Guitar
    University of Vermont, Burlington
  • Paul R. Hoffman
    University of Vermont, Burlington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1979
Speech Clinicians' Attribution of Personality Traits as a Function of Stuttering Severity
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1979, Vol. 22, 37-45. doi:10.1044/jshr.2201.37
History: Received March 10, 1978 , Accepted June 15, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1979, Vol. 22, 37-45. doi:10.1044/jshr.2201.37
History: Received March 10, 1978; Accepted June 15, 1978

Thirty-six speech-language pathologists participated in a study to evaluate clinicians' preconceptions of persons who stutter. Each rated a designated construct (the normally fluent individual, the mild stutterer, the moderate stutterer, the severe stutterer) using a personality trait scale. Results indicated that clinicians stereotypically assign negative personality traits to all levels of stuttering severity relative to normal. Their ratings further demonstrated that stutterers are generally considered to be a homogeneous group. Differentiation amongst stutterers was made only between the polar ends of the stuttering severity continuum (that is, mild vs. severe). Clinicians' stereotypical trait assignment was not related to their professional experience. Results are discussed with reference to their clinical implications.

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