Perception of Vowel Features in Temporally-Segmented Noise Portions of Stop-Consonant CV Syllables The ability of listeners to identify vowel features, given only segments of the aperiodic portion of CVs, was investigated. Segments of the aperiodic portions of stop consonant CVs, increasing in duration in 10-msec steps from onset, were identified by 18 listeners. The responses were analyzed for the correct identification of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1979
Perception of Vowel Features in Temporally-Segmented Noise Portions of Stop-Consonant CV Syllables
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Walter L. Cullinan
    University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City
  • Mary Ellen Tekieli
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1979
Perception of Vowel Features in Temporally-Segmented Noise Portions of Stop-Consonant CV Syllables
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1979, Vol. 22, 122-131. doi:10.1044/jshr.2201.122
History: Received March 21, 1978 , Accepted June 16, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1979, Vol. 22, 122-131. doi:10.1044/jshr.2201.122
History: Received March 21, 1978; Accepted June 16, 1978

The ability of listeners to identify vowel features, given only segments of the aperiodic portion of CVs, was investigated. Segments of the aperiodic portions of stop consonant CVs, increasing in duration in 10-msec steps from onset, were identified by 18 listeners. The responses were analyzed for the correct identification of vowel features. Coarticulatory effects of the vowel on the aperiodic portion were found to (1) occur early in the aperiodic portion, (2) vary with consonant and vowel, and (3) vary with vowel feature. In general, however, tongue advancement for the vowel was identified correctly most often, tongue height next most often, and the tense versus lax distinction least often. For some CVs, sufficient clues for above chance level of identification of a feature were present during the shortest segments of the aperiodic portion. The findings lend support to the point-of-view that listeners may be able to narrow the choice of the vowel in an unvoiced-stop-consonant CV to a small number of alternatives prior to the beginning of voicing.

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