Article/Report  |   December 2007
Third Graders’ Metalinguistic Skills, Reading Skills, and Stress Production in Derived English Words
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Jarmulowicz
    The University of Memphis
  • Valentina L. Taran
    The University of Memphis
  • Sarah E. Hay
    The University of Memphis
  • Contact author: Linda Jarmulowicz, Assistant Professor, The University of Memphis School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. E-mail: ljrmlwcz@memphis.edu.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article/Report   |   December 2007
Third Graders’ Metalinguistic Skills, Reading Skills, and Stress Production in Derived English Words
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2007, Vol. 50, 1593-1605. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/107)
History: Received July 14, 2006 , Revised November 14, 2006 , Accepted May 7, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2007, Vol. 50, 1593-1605. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/107)
History: Received July 14, 2006; Revised November 14, 2006; Accepted May 7, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose: This study examined relationships between 3rd graders’ metalinguistic skills (phonological and morphological awareness), reading skills (decoding and word identification), and accurate stress production in derived words with stress-changing suffixes.

Method: Seventy-six typically developing 3rd-grade children (M = 8;8[years;months]) participated in a battery of tests measuring general oral language ability, phonological and morphological awareness skills, reading skills, and derived word production.

Results: Significant positive correlations between stress accuracy in derived words and all other measures were found. Two multiple regressions were run, one with stress accuracy as the outcome variable and the other with decoding as the outcome variable. Metalinguistic and decoding skills independently accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in derived word stress production beyond that accounted for by age and general oral language ability. When decoding was the outcome variable, accurate stress production explained a significant amount of variance (11%) after phonological and morphological awareness were controlled.

Conclusion: The relationship between accurate stress production and decoding appears to be strong and bidirectional. Possibly, the stress accuracy measure taps into another level of phonological awareness (i.e., morphophonological awareness), which develops later than typical segmental measures of phonological awareness.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation 2004 New Investigator Grant, awarded to the first author. Many thanks to Kenn Apel, Helen S. Cairns, Maki Doiuchi, Bunty Ethington, and Kathleen Fulmer, and to the teachers and children who participated in this study.
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