Binaural Hearing of Speech for Aided and Unaided Conditions Differences in speech intelligibility and identification between binaural, monaural near ear, and monaural far ear conditions were studied in sound field conditions. Scores from listeners with normal hearing and with sensorineural losses were evalated in sound field conditions (unaided) and under conditions of hearing aid amplification (aided). For both conditions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1969
Binaural Hearing of Speech for Aided and Unaided Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald D. Dirks
    University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
  • Richard A. Wilson
    University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1969
Binaural Hearing of Speech for Aided and Unaided Conditions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1969, Vol. 12, 650-664. doi:10.1044/jshr.1203.650
History: Received December 20, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1969, Vol. 12, 650-664. doi:10.1044/jshr.1203.650
History: Received December 20, 1968

Differences in speech intelligibility and identification between binaural, monaural near ear, and monaural far ear conditions were studied in sound field conditions. Scores from listeners with normal hearing and with sensorineural losses were evalated in sound field conditions (unaided) and under conditions of hearing aid amplification (aided). For both conditions listeners with sensorineural hearing loss obtained a binaural advantage similar to that found for normal listeners. The binaural advantage could be demonstrated only when the primary and/or competing signal sources were located at an azimuth which resulted in interaural time differences for at least one of the signals. When the signals arrived simultaneously at the ears from the same loudspeaker, no binaural advantage was obtained. Differences in intelligibility and identification scores between monaural near ear and far ear conditions (6.0 dB) were almost twice as large as those found between binaural listening and monaural near ear listening (3.3 dB).

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