The Relation of Vibrator Surface Area and Static Application Force to the Vibrator-to-Head Coupling Twelve young adult men with normal hearing and no history of ear disease took part in our study of the relation of vibrator surface area and static application force to the vibrator-to-head coupling. For vibrator surface areas of 1.125, 2.25, and 4.5 cm2 coupled to the forehead under static forces ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1968
The Relation of Vibrator Surface Area and Static Application Force to the Vibrator-to-Head Coupling
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • E. R. Nilo
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1968
The Relation of Vibrator Surface Area and Static Application Force to the Vibrator-to-Head Coupling
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 805-810. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.805
History: Received January 26, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 805-810. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.805
History: Received January 26, 1968

Twelve young adult men with normal hearing and no history of ear disease took part in our study of the relation of vibrator surface area and static application force to the vibrator-to-head coupling. For vibrator surface areas of 1.125, 2.25, and 4.5 cm2 coupled to the forehead under static forces of 150, 300, and 600 gm, monaural thresholds of bone-conduction hearing were determined at frequencies 250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz. With surface area constant, threshold improvement was frequency dependent. It decreased with increasing frequency until at 2000 Hz it was minimal. In contrast to this, with force constant, the influence of surface area was observed to begin at 2000 Hz. Preliminary study suggests this influence would extend to 4000 Hz. In view of the respective influence of application force and surface area to bone-conduction hearing, equating vibrator-to-head coupling on the basis of pressure (force per unit area), when there are two or more vibrators, may not represent an adequate control.

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