Confusions Among Visually Perceived Consonants Eighteen college students with normal hearing responded to the visual perception of initial and final consonants in an English-like phonetic environment in a test of the homopheny of consonant sounds of English. The Multiple-choice Intelligibility Test provided stimulus items but special response sheets were provided to allow each subject a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1968
Confusions Among Visually Perceived Consonants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cletus G. Fisher
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1968
Confusions Among Visually Perceived Consonants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 796-804. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.796
History: Received March 22, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 796-804. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.796
History: Received March 22, 1968

Eighteen college students with normal hearing responded to the visual perception of initial and final consonants in an English-like phonetic environment in a test of the homopheny of consonant sounds of English. The Multiple-choice Intelligibility Test provided stimulus items but special response sheets were provided to allow each subject a possible response of any consonant judged homotypical or homorganic to the stimulus item. Correct answers as possible responses were deleted to provide a usable number of confusions. Subjects were not aware of the deletion of correct responses even after the task was completed. Resulting confusion matrices were analyzed for significant confusions among consonants; these confusions were grouped into mutually exclusive classes termed visemes. The results tend to support previously published linguistic groupings of homophenous sounds rather than the classical listing from the developers of speechreading methodology. Variations from the former are explained in terms of the addition of minimal phonetic redundancy.

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