Predicting Cinefluorographic Measures of Velopharyngeal Opening from Lateral Still X-Ray Films The purpose of this project was to estimate how well one can predict measures of velopharyngeal opening during cinefluorographic films from measures taken from single-exposure, still, x-ray films. Both types of films were obtained for 37 subjects with surgically repaired cleft palate. Single-exposure films were taken during sustained /u/, sustained ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1968
Predicting Cinefluorographic Measures of Velopharyngeal Opening from Lateral Still X-Ray Films
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James F. Lubker
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
  • Hughlett L. Morris
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1968
Predicting Cinefluorographic Measures of Velopharyngeal Opening from Lateral Still X-Ray Films
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 747-753. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.747
History: Received February 29, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 747-753. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.747
History: Received February 29, 1968

The purpose of this project was to estimate how well one can predict measures of velopharyngeal opening during cinefluorographic films from measures taken from single-exposure, still, x-ray films. Both types of films were obtained for 37 subjects with surgically repaired cleft palate. Single-exposure films were taken during sustained /u/, sustained /s/, and at rest. Cinefluorographic films were taken during a variety of speech tasks. Obtained correlations between measurements of velopharyngeal opening taken from still and cine films were in the order of 0.70, and mean differences between the two types of measurements were not significant for still /s/, but were significant for still /u/. If only one single-exposure film is to be used for estimating velopharyngeal opening shown during cinefluorography, a still film taken during sustained /s/ seems the best choice.

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