The Acquisition of English Morphology by Normal and Educable Mentally Retarded Children To study the acquisition of English morphology by 30 educable mentally retarded children and 30 normal children, a list of lexicon words was developed which paralleled phonologically and morphologically the nonsense words used by Berko. Results indicate that significant quantitative differences existed favoring the normal children in all the measures ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1968
The Acquisition of English Morphology by Normal and Educable Mentally Retarded Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie U. Newfield
    Houston Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital Clinic, Houston, Texas
  • Bernard B. Schlanger
    City University of New York, New York, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1968
The Acquisition of English Morphology by Normal and Educable Mentally Retarded Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 693-706. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.693
History: Received April 12, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1968, Vol. 11, 693-706. doi:10.1044/jshr.1104.693
History: Received April 12, 1968

To study the acquisition of English morphology by 30 educable mentally retarded children and 30 normal children, a list of lexicon words was developed which paralleled phonologically and morphologically the nonsense words used by Berko. Results indicate that significant quantitative differences existed favoring the normal children in all the measures of morphology, measured by lexicon words and nonsense words. Nevertheless, the order of acquisition of morphology by the retarded children, particularly in respect to nonsense words, paralleled that of the normal children.

With the normal and retarded children an undefined time lag existed between the production of correct English morphological inflection forms with familiar words and the generalization of these forms to unfamiliar words, indicating knowledge of a morphological rule. The retarded children demonstrated greater inability than the normal children studied in generalization from familiar to unfamiliar words.

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