Articulatory Effects of Monaural and Binaural Masking in Normal Speaking Adults Wearing Palatal Appliances Ten normal speaking adults (five male, five female) performed three speaking tasks during conditions of monaural and binaural masking with and without complete palatal appliances. Significant effects on the subjects' articulation were found for the factors of masking type, palatal appliance and speaking task. No significant effects were found for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1979
Articulatory Effects of Monaural and Binaural Masking in Normal Speaking Adults Wearing Palatal Appliances
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Walter H. Manning
    Memphis State University, Memphis, Tennessee
  • Linda L. Riensche
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Gird A. McCarty, Jr.
    University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences, College of Dentistry, Memphis, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1979
Articulatory Effects of Monaural and Binaural Masking in Normal Speaking Adults Wearing Palatal Appliances
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1979, Vol. 22, 773-783. doi:10.1044/jshr.2204.773
History: Received September 25, 1978 , Accepted March 12, 1979
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1979, Vol. 22, 773-783. doi:10.1044/jshr.2204.773
History: Received September 25, 1978; Accepted March 12, 1979

Ten normal speaking adults (five male, five female) performed three speaking tasks during conditions of monaural and binaural masking with and without complete palatal appliances. Significant effects on the subjects' articulation were found for the factors of masking type, palatal appliance and speaking task. No significant effects were found for monaural right- versus monaural left-ear masking or sex of the speakers. The findings are similar to previous results using binaural masking and indicate that the disruptive effect of monaural masking on the articulation of adult subjects is approximately midway between the effects of no masking and binaural masking. It is suggested that the lack of a significant effect for right-ear versus left-ear monaural masking may be due to the high degree of automatization which the subjects possessed for the stimuli used in the speaking tasks.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access