Static Acoustic-Immittance Measurements The basic principles of deriving static acoustic-immittance measurements in human ears are presented. Problems caused by differences in instrumentation, computations, and measurement technique are discussed in terms of the utility and comparisons of static acoustic-immittance measurements. Data are provided regarding the short- and long-term variabilities inherent to static measurements. Although ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   December 01, 1979
Static Acoustic-Immittance Measurements
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Terry L. Wiley
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Michael G. Block
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Tutorial
Tutorial   |   December 01, 1979
Static Acoustic-Immittance Measurements
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1979, Vol. 22, 677-696. doi:10.1044/jshr.2204.677
History: Received September 27, 1978 , Accepted December 26, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1979, Vol. 22, 677-696. doi:10.1044/jshr.2204.677
History: Received September 27, 1978; Accepted December 26, 1978

The basic principles of deriving static acoustic-immittance measurements in human ears are presented. Problems caused by differences in instrumentation, computations, and measurement technique are discussed in terms of the utility and comparisons of static acoustic-immittance measurements. Data are provided regarding the short- and long-term variabilities inherent to static measurements. Although our subject pool was relatively small, certain patterns were apparent in the short- and long-term variability inherent to static acoustic-impedance measurements. The intra-event variability about the mean static acoustic impedance was small and varied inversely with probe-tone frequency. Standard deviations were less than 50 acoustic ohms for a 220-Hz probe tone and less than 25 acoustic ohms for a 660-Hz probe tone. Session-to-session variability in static measurements varied little within subjects but varied greatly across subjects. There was little correlation between the mean and standard deviation for within-subject measurements. Standard deviations across subjects approximate a relatively constant proportion (30–40%) of the mean static value. The need for large population studies of static acoustic-immittance measurements is noted.

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