Women Who Stutter: Personality and Speech Characteristics This investigation was undertaken to determine whether adult female stutterers, when compared to adult male stutterers, would (1) present a different pattern of speech fluency or (2) evidence reduced self-esteem or both. Spontaneous speech samples were obtained from 10 adult female stutterers, 10 adult male stutterers, and 10 adult female ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1979
Women Who Stutter: Personality and Speech Characteristics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen-Marie Silverman
    Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Catherine H. Zimmer
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1979
Women Who Stutter: Personality and Speech Characteristics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1979, Vol. 22, 553-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.2203.553
History: Received October 25, 1978 , Accepted December 27, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1979, Vol. 22, 553-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.2203.553
History: Received October 25, 1978; Accepted December 27, 1978

This investigation was undertaken to determine whether adult female stutterers, when compared to adult male stutterers, would (1) present a different pattern of speech fluency or (2) evidence reduced self-esteem or both. Spontaneous speech samples were obtained from 10 adult female stutterers, 10 adult male stutterers, and 10 adult female nonstutterers. All were administered the California Test of Personality and semantic differential forms designed to assess self-concept. The female stutterers produced significantly fewer instances of revision-incomplete phrase than either of the other two groups and were more heterogeneous with respect to total frequency of disfluency. The female stutterers evidenced a significantly higher level of self-esteem than the male stutterers. Moreover, unlike the male stutterers, the female stutterers did not consider themselves handicapped. This investigation indicates that there may be significant differences in the stuttering symptomatology of adults that are related to gender.

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