Age and the Decoding of Coarticulatory Cues Thirty-two subjects between the ages of 60 and 80 years listened to tape-recorded voiceless stop + vowel syllables and subsyllabic segments systematically isolated from the syllables by electronic gating. This procedure allowed examination of the ability of older adults to perceive the acoustic effects of coarticulation. Comparison of the performances ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1979
Age and the Decoding of Coarticulatory Cues
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martha M. Parnell
    University of Missouri-Columbia
  • James D. Amerman
    University of Missouri-Columbia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1979
Age and the Decoding of Coarticulatory Cues
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1979, Vol. 22, 433-445. doi:10.1044/jshr.2203.433
History: Received August 5, 1978 , Accepted December 8, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1979, Vol. 22, 433-445. doi:10.1044/jshr.2203.433
History: Received August 5, 1978; Accepted December 8, 1978

Thirty-two subjects between the ages of 60 and 80 years listened to tape-recorded voiceless stop + vowel syllables and subsyllabic segments systematically isolated from the syllables by electronic gating. This procedure allowed examination of the ability of older adults to perceive the acoustic effects of coarticulation. Comparison of the performances of subjects in the older age groups with previous data concerning four year olds, 11 year olds, and young adults (Parnell and Amerman, 1978) revealed a close resemblance between the performance of four year olds and older adults in the proportion of correct syllable identifications, consistency of responses and substitution preferences. On all of these measures, the responses of these two age groups differed significantly from those of the 11 year olds and young adults. The results suggest a reduction in decoding precision for these coarticulatory cues as a function of the aging process.

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