Visual Vowel and Diphthong Perception from Two Horizontal Viewing Angles This study investigated vowel and diphthong lipreading performance from 0° and 90° angles of observation. Sixteen English vowels and diphthongs were placed in an /h—g/ context to form the stimulus items. Each item was presented by a speaker ten times in random order for a total of 160 items. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1979
Visual Vowel and Diphthong Perception from Two Horizontal Viewing Angles
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia D. Wozniak
    Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago
  • Pamela L. Jackson
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1979
Visual Vowel and Diphthong Perception from Two Horizontal Viewing Angles
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 354-365. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.354
History: Received February 16, 1978 , Accepted August 8, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 354-365. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.354
History: Received February 16, 1978; Accepted August 8, 1978

This study investigated vowel and diphthong lipreading performance from 0° and 90° angles of observation. Sixteen English vowels and diphthongs were placed in an /h—g/ context to form the stimulus items. Each item was presented by a speaker ten times in random order for a total of 160 items. The speaker was simultaneously videotaped from 0° and 90° angles under optimal lighting conditions. Ten normal hearing adult subjects phonetically recorded the vowel or diphthong they perceived as each item was visually presented. The diphthong stimuli were significantly easier to identify than the vowel stimuli at both angles of observation. In addition, no significant differences were found between the 0° and the 90° angles in terms of percentage of correct identifications of all phonemes examined. Orderly, predictable confusions also were observed. Those confusions occurring in visual diphthong recognition tended to shift toward the stressed vowel element of the diphthong or to a vowel produced in a manner similar to the stressed element.

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