Acoustic-Reflex Growth and Loudness Acoustic-reflex growth functions and loudness-balance judgments were obtained for three normal-hearing subjects with normal middle-ear function. The hypothesis that acoustic reflex-activating signals producing proportionately equal acoustic-impedance changes are judged equal in loudness was evaluated. The mean acoustic impedance and associated standard deviations were computed for the baseline (static) and activator ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1979
Acoustic-Reflex Growth and Loudness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael G. Block
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Terry L. Wiley
    University of Wisconsin, Madison
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1979
Acoustic-Reflex Growth and Loudness
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 295-310. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.295
History: Received March 15, 1978 , Accepted July 18, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 295-310. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.295
History: Received March 15, 1978; Accepted July 18, 1978

Acoustic-reflex growth functions and loudness-balance judgments were obtained for three normal-hearing subjects with normal middle-ear function. The hypothesis that acoustic reflex-activating signals producing proportionately equal acoustic-impedance changes are judged equal in loudness was evaluated. The mean acoustic impedance and associated standard deviations were computed for the baseline (static) and activator (reflex) portions of each reflex event. An acoustic-impedance change exceeding two standard deviations of baseline was defined as the criterion acoustic-reflex response. Acoustic impedance was measured as a function of activator SPL for broadband noise and a 1000-Hz tone from criterion magnitude to the maximum acoustic impedance (or 120-dB SPL). This was defined as the dynamic range of reflex growth. Loudness-balance measurements were made for the 1000-Hz tone and broadband noise at SPL’s representing 30, 50, and 70% of the individual dynamic range. The data supported the hypothesis.

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